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BA in Economics


 

UNITY UNIVERSITY

Faculty Of Business, Economics & Social Sciences

Department Of Economics  

 

The Department of Economics offers two MA degree programs in Business Economics and in Development Economics in regular and evening sessions and BA degree program in Economics   in the regular program and in Distance mode. 

 

Bachelor of Arts in Economics

  1. PROGRAM PROFILE

The Economics program should enable the graduates to acquire both theoretical knowledge and practical know-how related to the different economic issues enabling them to be competent nationally and internationally. It should help them to acquire the knowledge of identifying various economic problems and make the right decision both at the firm and national level.

  1.   OBJECTIVES OF THE PROGRAM

    1. General Objectives

The general objective of the undergraduate degree program is to give students a firm grounding in modern economic theory and a basic understanding of economic process to provide a descriptive and inferential knowledge of Ethiopia, and world economy.

2.2   Specific Objectives

The specific objectives are to:

  • Develop students’ abilities for quantitative analysis and independent marginal thinking skill;
  • Produce high-caliber manpower possessing knowledge and skills of the highest standard; and
  • Conduct research on specific and socio-economic problems of the country.

 

 

  1. GRADUATES’ PROFILE

The successful completion of the degree program prepares students for further study in economics or for careers in business administration and finance, consulting, tax law, taxation and related fields and public policy. Besides, successful undergraduate students should have profound economics knowledge that helps them to develop skills in preparing, implementing and evaluating business and development project.

 

  1. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

The requirements for admission in the university will be as follows:

  • Successful completion of preparatory program:

                               Or

  • Advanced Standing (12+2) Diploma from accredited institutions;

                               Or

  • Degree holders seeking another degree;

                               Or

  • Transfer from recognized Higher Education Institution;

                               Or

  • TVET:
  • EGSECE
  • One  year of practice evidence
  • Passing Level IV COC
  • Passing University entrance examination
    • Higher Education Equivalence is a requirement for those coming from other countries.

 

  1. DURATION OF THE STUDY
  • The program will take three years.
  • The total number of credit hours to be taken within this three years will be 111( one hundred eleven credit hours).

 

  1. GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

Graduate students will be awarded the “Bachelor of Arts Degree in Economics” if they fulfill the following requirements:

  • A minimum credit hour of 111;
  • A Minimum Cumulative Grade Point Average of 2.00;
  • A Minimum Cumulative Grade Point Average of 2.00 in main courses;
  • No F, NG, I, in any course; and
  • Compliance with the regulation of the University.

 

7. DEGREE NOMENCLATURE

    A candidate, after successful completion of the programs, will be awarded first degree and written as the degree of:

  • “Bachelor of Arts in Economics”
  • አርትስ ባችለር  ዲግሪ  በኢኮኖሚክስ
  1. SUMMARY OF COURSES

 

No.

Course. No.

Course Title

Cr. Hr.

Pre-requisite

 

 

MAIN COURSES

 

 

1

Econ 111

Calculus for Economists

3

None

2

Econ 121

Microeconomics I

3

None

3

Econ 122

Microeconomics  II

3

Econ 121

4

Econ 112

Linear Algebra and Mathematical Programming

3

None

5

Econ 131

Macroeconomics I

3

None

6

Econ 132

Macroeconomics II

3

Econ 131

7

Econ 142

Statistics for Economists

3

Stat 192

8

Econ 251

Mathematical Economics

3

Econ 111, Econ 112

9

Econ 261

Econometrics I

3

Econ 142

10

Econ 262

Econometrics II

3

Econ 261

11

Econ 263

Computer Application in Economics

3

Comp 105, Econ 261 & 262

12

Econ 264

Research Method for Economists

3

Econ 261, 262 &  263

13

Econ 271

Development Economics  I

3

None

14

Econ 272

Development Economics II

3

Econ 271

15

Econ 281

International Economics I

3

Econ 122

16

Econ 282

International Economics II

3

Econ 281 (2081)

17

Econ 291

Natural Resource & Environmental Economics

3

Econ 122

18

Econ 311

Labor Economics

3

Econ 122

19

Econ 312

Economics of Industry

3

Econ 122

20

Econ 311

Economics of Agriculture

3

Econ 121

21

Econ 321

Monetary Economics: Theory & Policy

3

Econ 132

22

Econ 322

Public Finance

3

Econ 321

23

Econ 331

Development Planning and Project Analysis I

3

Econ 272

24

Econ 332

Development Planning and Project Analysis II

3

Econ 331

25

Econ 341

History of Economic Thought I

3

None

26

Econ 342

History of Economic Thought II

3

Econ 341

27

Econ 351

Thesis in Economics I

3*

Econ 264

28

Econ 352

Thesis in Economics II

3

Econ 351

Main Courses Total

84

 

 

 

SUPPORTIVE COURSES

 

 

1

ACFN 201

Principles of Accounting I

3

None

2

ACFN 202

Principles of Accounting II

3

ACFN 201

3

Mgmt 212

Introduction to Management

3

None

4

Stat 192

Introduction to Statistics

3

None

Supportive Courses Total

12

 

No.

Course. No.

Course Title

Cr. Hr.

Pre-requisite

 

GENERAL COURSES

 

1

Enla 100

Communicative English

3

None

2

Enla 201

Basic writing skills

3

Enla 100

3

Phil 101

Introduction to philosophy( Logic)

3

None

4

Phil. 103

Civics and Ethical Education

3

None

5

Comp 105

Introduction to Computer technology

3

None

General Courses Total

15

 

Grand Total

111

 

           


        * Indicates that the grade of this course is to be graded after the completion of Thesis in

           Economics II (i.e. after semester II)

9. COURSE DETEALS

     

        MAIN COURSES

Econ 111. Calculus for Economists, Cr.hr. 3

Pre-requisite – None

Course Description

This course comprises six chapters having different mathematical concepts that could be applied to economic analysis. It starts with the introduction to functions; and then the concept of limits, derivatives, integrals and difference and differential equations with their applications.

 

Econ 121.  Microeconomics I, Cr.hr. 3

Pre-requisite – None

Course Description

The course covers theories of consumer behaviour, producer behaviour and theories of market structure, the neoclassical theory of pricing for perfectly competitive market. It begins presenting the assumptions underlying each theory; it proceeds on analysing the behaviour of economic unit (the consumer or producer) in an attempt to meet its objective and finding the equilibrium of these economic units.

 

Econ 122. Microeconomics II, Cr.hr. 3

Pre-requisite – Econ 121

Course Description

The course covers the theories of market structure, the neoclassical theory of pricing for three product market structures (pure monopoly, monopolistic competition and oligopoly market structures), factor market pricing, general equilibrium analysis and asymmetric information. It begins presenting the assumptions underlying each theory; it proceeds on analysing the behaviour of economic unit (the producer) in an attempt to meet its objective and finding the equilibrium of these economic units.

 

 

Econ 112. Linear Algebra for Economists, Cr.hr. 3

Pre-requisite – None

Course Description

This is quantitative course, which is helpful for project planning and programming purposes. Thus, it is offered to students to acquaint them with this vital analytical tool. It mainly focuses on Linear Algebra and applications, various programming models and their application.

 

Econ 131. Macroeconomics I, Cr.hr. 3

Pre-requisite – None

Course Description

Macroeconomics I focus mainly on short-run analysis of an economy or business cycle. Hence, the main aim of this course is to present and discuss the different views of economists (as represented by school of thought) on how an economy behaves in the short-run; how equilibrium is achieved in the short-run; and the role of market forces and government in short-run economic stabilization. For this purpose, this part is divided in to three parts: Introduction, aggregate demand and supply analysis of a closed economy, and the analysis of open economy macroeconomics.

 

Econ 132. Macroeconomics II, Cr.hr. 3

Pre-requisite – Econ 131

Course Description

Macroeconomics II is divided into six chapters. The first chapter discusses the theories of investment. The second chapter is about theories of money demand and supply; followed by the third chapter that presents the macroeconomic policy debates. Chapter four is concerned with models of economic growth, including Neo-Classical theories of economic growth. It mainly deliberates on the Harod-Domar, the Solow- Swan, and Solow-Swan with technology models of economic growth. The fifth chapter deals with the macroeconomic aspects of labour market. Finally, the sixth chapter presents a review of the applicability of conventional macroeconomic tools for the developing world, with special reference to African economy.

 

Econ 142.  Statistics for Economists, Cr.hr. 3

Pre-requisite – Stat 192

Course Description

This course is largely a mathematical statistics course. It is designed to acquaint students with the basics of probability theory, parameter estimation and hypothesis testing. A prior knowledge of such mathematical concepts as differentiation, integration and matrix algebra is mandatory. The rationale for providing Statistics for Economists is to equip students with an arsenal of techniques for understanding econometrics, a subject that focuses on empirical analysis of problems arising in social sciences such as economics, politics, etc. Students are thus, advised at the outset to bear in mind the integration between statistics and econometrics, which is offered next semester.

 

 

 

Econ 251. Mathematical Economics, Cr.hr. 3

Pre-requisite – Econ 111, 112

Course Description

This course introduces and discusses mathematical techniques used in economic analysis such as constrained and unconstrained optimization theories applicable in solving consumer and producer optimization problems and general equilibrium models. It also equips students with the concept of the Kuhn–tucker theorems, production theory, introduction to difference and differential equation with their respective applications to solve the real and practical problems in the economy and formulate sound and appropriate economic policies

 

Econ 261. Econometrics I, Cr.hr. 3

Pre-requisite – Econ 142   

Course Description

The course aims at introducing the theory (and practice) of cross-sectional econometrics. It first makes an introduction to the basic concepts in econometrics like economic and econometric modeling as well as types of data; then proceeds to the simple classical linear regression model and introduces estimation techniques method of moments, ordinary least squares and maximum likelihood estimation, inference and analyses of residuals. This is then built into the multiple linear regression. After making tests of linear restrictions emanating from economic theory, the course will finally try to highlight the problems of multicollinearity, heteroscedasticity and autocorrelation. The course builds upon students’ previous course Statistics for Economists. Hence, familiarity with the material, particularly sampling distributions, estimation and hypothesis testing will be of much help. These will be applied on Ethiopian/international data using statistical packages.

 

Econ 262. Econometrics II, Cr.hr. 3

Pre-requisite – Econ 261

Course Description

This course is a continuation of Econometrics I.  It aims at introducing the theory (and practice) of regression on qualitative information, time series and panel data econometrics as well as simultaneous equation modeling. It first makes an introduction to the basic concepts in qualitative information modeling such as dummy variable regression and binary choice models (LPM, Logit and Probit). Elementary time series models, estimations and tests for both stationary and non-stationary data will then be discussed.  It also covers introduction to simultaneous equation modeling with alternative estimation methods. Introductory pooled cross-sectional and panel data models will finally be highlighted.

 

Econ 263. Computer Application in Economics, Cr.hr. 3

Pre-requisite – Comp 105, Econ 261, 262

Course Description

The Economics world is very complicated and economists use economic theory to try to organize the way that they conceptualize the relationships among variables. Economic models are particular representations, usually mathematical representations, of economic theories. An important feature of an economic theory or model is that it focuses on the most important features of the relation in question and deletes unimportant features. Models are simplification, but they do not fit data perfectly. Discrepancies between models and data are often treated as random elements that have well defined statistical properties.

 

Econ 264. Research Method for Economists, Cr.hr. 3

Pre-requisite – Econ 261, 262, 263

Course Description

Research in any discipline is a base for its development. Basic knowledge in a discipline is also generated through research. Economic research is additionally required for nations to grow at all levels and to have a healthy macroeconomic environment. Research undertakings at household, firm, national and cross-country levels are relevant. Understanding the basics of research in general and economic research in particular is, therefore, vital.  This course is an introductory course which helps students to get a preliminary knowledge on the various methods in research and their applications. Specific techniques and steps in economic research will be addressed. Upon the progress of the course, emphasis will be laid on research proposal writing, sampling techniques, data collection methods, hypothesis testing, data analysis, research report writing, etc. Note that this course will equip students with an arsenal of techniques in the short-run to effectively write term papers in various courses and senior essay before graduation, and in the long-run, to research on various economic issues after graduation.

 

Econ 271. Development Economics I, Cr.hr. 3

Pre-requisite – None

Course Description

The module is to provide a brief overview of the development and underdevelopment of nations and outstanding development theories. It explores the principles, concepts and theories that have been developed and applied by economists for the study of the problems of developing nations. In addition, it examines recent developments in theories of growth and transformation in the context of developing economies and concentrates on key areas of concern to those responsible for development policy. Furthermore, it will address the main challenges the developing world faces and consider alternative polices and modern approaches that may contribute to stimulating growth and speeding economic development in less developed countries. Moreover, it introduces the student to some of the main development issues that have contributed to the development paths pursued by developing countries like Ethiopia.

 

Econ 272. Development Economics II, Cr.hr. 3

Pre-requisite – Econ 271

Course Description

The module is to provide a brief overview of the development and underdevelopment of nations and outstanding development theories. It explores the principles, concepts and theories that have been developed and applied by economists for the study of the problems of developing nations. In addition, it examines recent developments in theories of growth and transformation in the context of developing economies and concentrates on key areas of concern to those responsible for development policy. Furthermore, it will address the main challenges developing world faces and consider alternative polices and modern approaches that may contribute to stimulating growth and speeding economic development in less developed countries. Moreover, it introduces the student to some of the main development issues that have contributed to the development paths pursued by developing countries like Ethiopia.

 

Econ 281. International Economics I, Cr.hr. 3

Pre-requisite – Econ 122

Course Description

The course deals with international trade theories and policy issues and how international trade is financed. It  aims to provide a highly focused discussion of topics in international economics in two separate subject areas of international trade and international finance in the context of developing countries. Issues covered in this  course are conventional and non-conventional trade theories, which include the classical model (Smith and Ricardo), the modern and neoclassical theory of trade (the H-O-S model, the Stolper-Samuelson Theorem, and the Leontief Paradox), the New Trade Theories and the African context (Imperfect competition and scale economies), Economic Integration and Theories of Customs Union, Trade Policies and Developing Countries (Import Substitution and Export Promotion, Trade and Development, the World Trade Organization and Developing Countries, etc).

 

Econ 282.  International Economics II, Cr.hr. 3

Pre-requisite – Econ 281

Course Description

Issues covered in this course are: the issues of the Balance of Payments (and different approaches to balance of payments), Exchange Rate Economics, Open-Economy Macroeconomics (IS-LM-BP framework, the Mundel-Fleming Model), the Evolution of International Financial Institutions (the IMF, the World Bank, etc…), Impact of Capital Flows and the Debt Crisis in African Context, etc.

 

Econ 291. Natural Resource and Environmental Economics, Cr.hr. 3

Pre-requisite – Econ 122

Course Description

The subject is concerned with the relationship between environment and economic activities; the issue and role of property rights; optimal and sustainable utilization of depletable (non-renewable) and renewable resources; and the optimal pollution control issues. Since every rational individual and the society as a whole are concerned with the balance between human activities and preservation of safe environment for the existing and future generations, the basic question is how to use those resources in an optimal and sustainable manner. The course aims at enabling the students to understand such circumstances and be aware of the effects of economic activities on the environment in policy-making processes.

 

 

 

 

 

Econ 311. Labor Economics, Cr.hr. 3

Pre-requisite – Econ 122

Course Description

A good grasp of manpower economics is vital for designing and understanding manpower policies; and more generally for appreciating how a modern economy functions.

 

Econ 312.  Economics of Industry, Cr.hr. 3

Pre-requisite – Econ 122

Course Description

Industrial Economics is the study of firms, industries and markets. It looks at firms of all sizes - from local corner shops to multinational giants and it considers a whole range of industries, such as textile, electricity generation, car production and restaurants, etc... When analyzing decision making at the levels of the individual firm and industry, Industrial Economics helps us to understand such issues as:

  • the levels to which capacity, output and prices are set;
  • the extent to which products are differentiated from each other; and
  • how much firms invest in research and development (R&D).

 

Econ 311. Economics of Agriculture, Cr.hr. 3

Pre-requisite – Econ 121

Course Description

Economics of Agriculture, deals with basic concepts underlying peasant characteristics, peasant production economics, theories of optimization and individual and household decision-making process, agricultural marketing and financing, models of agricultural development, and policies for solving the problems of agricultural and rural development in poor countries of the world.

 

Econ 321. Monetary Economics: Theory and Policy, Cr.hr. 3

Pre-requisite – Econ 132

Course Description

This course deals with monetary aspect of an economy. It is designed to deepen and consolidate the students’ knowledge about the roles and functions of money, financial institution and monetary policies. Major topics of the course are: functions of money and financial institutions (including formal and informal financial institutions and the financial market at large) in historical perspectives; the demand for money; the supply of money; monetary theories and policy prescription of different schools of economic thoughts: monetary theories and policies in developing countries; and money and monetary policies in Ethiopia.

 

Econ 322.  Public Finance, Cr.hr. 3

Pre-requisite – Econ 321

Course Description

This course deals with the cause of market failure, the role of the government, the concept of public finance, source of government revenue: - taxation and non-tax, income tax base, marginal tax, computation of income tax, incidence of tax, buoyancy and elasticity of tax, tax reform of public expenditure, budgetary process and budget deficits, deficit financing and the public debt management, and fiscal decentralization.

 

Econ 331. Development Planning and Project Analysis I, Cr.hr. 3

Pre-requisite – Econ 272 

Course Description

The course is organized into four chapters. The first chapter is devoted to the introductory parts of planning; while the second chapter deals with the meaning, characteristics and types of planning. The third chapter builds on quantitative development planning techniques. The last chapter deals with planning in practice by taking experiences from Ethiopia and other countries.

 

Econ 332 .  Development Planning and Project Analysis II, Cr.hr. 3

Pre-requisite – Econ 331

 Course Description

This course focuses on project implementation, monitoring and evaluation. The subject matter of project analysis is outreaching beyond the Cost-Benefit analysis. This time government and non-government organizations are highly demanding experts with knowledge of monitoring and impact evaluations. The course is organized into five major chapters. The first chapter is devoted to the basic concepts and cycles of a project. The second chapter deals with financial analysis and appraisal of projects. The third chapter builds on the economic analysis of the project. Chapters four and five discuss the concepts of project monitoring and evaluation.

 

Econ 341.  History of Economic Thought I, Cr.hr. 3

Pre-requisite – None    

Course Description

The course History of Economic Thought I provides students with general picture of the development of economics until the emergence of classical economics, socialism and marginal revolution. The course demonstrates the contributions of pre-classical thinking, classical thinkers and deviant thinkers from classicism in shaping contemporary economic thought.

 

Econ 342.   History of Economic Thought II, Cr.hr. 3

Pre-requisite – Econ 341

Course Description

Critical analysis of preceding schools of thought, beginning from economic ideas of the ancient philosophers up to more recent ones, which help students in developing broader understanding of contemporary economic theories, is the focus of History of Economic Thought II. That is, as a continuation of the first, History of Economic Thought II mainly deals with economic theories and Schools of thought  that have developed after Classical School of thought. Hence, this course is mainly about the major families of thought, namely Neoclassical, Institutional school, and the other non-Marxian heterodox economic thoughts, Keynesian school, their ramifications and their most recent reformulations, and reinterpretations.

 

 

 

Econ 351.  Thesis in Economics I, Cr.hr. 3

Pre-requisite – Econ 264

Course Description

This course is designed to help students to write research paper by their proxy senior academic staff.

 

Econ 352. Thesis in Economics II, Cr.hr. 3

Pre-requisite – Econ 351

Course Description

This course is designed to help students to write research paper by their proxy senior academic staff.

 

SUPPORTIVE COURSES

 

AcFN 201. Principles of Accounting I, Cr.hr. 3

Pre-requisite – None   

Course Description

This course deals with the evolution of accounting; importance of accounting for users; relevance of the Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP); the accounting cycle for service and merchandising enterprises; the accounting for deferrals and accruals; and the accounting for cash.                                                             

 

SUPPORTIVE COURSES

 

Mgmt 212. Introduction to Management, Cr.hr. 3

Pre-requisite – None 

Course Description

This course focuses on the basic concepts and principles of management, the functions of planning, organizing, staffing, directing and controlling, and their relationships to key issues in management practices, such as leadership and motivation. Decision making and effective communication are also discussed.

 

AcFN 201. Principles of Accounting I, Cr.hr. 3

Pre-requisite – None

Course Description

This course deals with the evolution of accounting; importance of accounting for users; relevance of the Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP); the accounting cycle for service and merchandising enterprises; the accounting for deferrals and accruals; and the accounting for cash.

 

AcFN 202. Principles of Accounting II, Cr.hr. 3

Pre-requisite – ACFN 201  

Course Description

This course deals with accounting for assets, which includes receivables, inventories, plant assets, natural resources, intangible assets; accounting for current liabilities, including accounts payables, notes, payroll in the Ethiopian context, warranty, and others; accounting for partnership and corporate type of business organizations.

 

Stat 192. Introduction to Statistics, Cr.hr. 3

Pre-requisite –None

Course Description

Meaning of statistics; Methods of data collection; Methods of data presentation; Measures of location; Measures of variation; Moments, skewness and kurtosis; Counting Techniques; Concepts of Probability (classical approach); Probability distributions: Binomial, Poisson, Normal, t and Chi-square; Sampling and Sampling Distribution of the mean and proportion; Elementary description of the tools of statistical inference: Basic concepts; Estimation: (Point and Interval) for the population mean and proportion; Hypothesis testing on the population mean and proportion; Chi-square test of association. Each topic should begin with motivating examples.

 

 

GENERAL COURSES

 

 

Enla 100. Communication English Skills, Cr.hr. 3

Pre-requisite – None

Course Description

This is a course that tries to help learners improve their receptive and productive skills. In other words, through the various exercises or activates in this course, learners get the chance to speak, listen, read and write in English. Part and parcel of these skills are basic grammar and vocabulary practices. Aside from this, the course helps learners to develop a variety of learning strategies such as note-taking and presentation skills, which they can apply in other academic subjects.

 

ENLA 201, Basic Writing Skills, Cr.hr. 3

Pre-requisite - Enla 100

Course Description  

This course that primarily equips learners with basic writing skills. To this end, such topics as mechanics, sentence joining and improvement, the process of writing, paragraph and essay writing are included.

 

Phil 103. Civics and Ethical Education, Cr.hr. 3

Pre-requisite – None 

Course Description

This course explores what it means to be an informed, participating citizen in a democratic society. Students will learn about the elements of democracy and the meaning of democratic citizenship in local, national, and global contexts. In addition, students will learn about social change, examine decision-making processes in Ethiopia, explore their own and others’ beliefs and perspectives on civics questions, and learn how to think and act critically and creatively about public issues.

 

 

 

Phil 101. Introduction to Philosophy (Logic) Cr.hr. 3

Pre-requisite – None 

Course Description

Logic as one of the disciplines of philosophy is concerned with the formulation of principles of correct thinking. Since the times of Aristotle logic has been recognized as fundamental importance to all intellectual activity which aims at what is called truth. It is the arbiter of all human reasoning. The dictum “logic is the dispenser of hazy and confused thinking” indicates the importance of a course in logic.

 

The course attempts to familiarize students with the topics: Basic concept of logic, “Three laws of thought” arguments and argument form, recognizing argument in passages, deductive and inductive arguments, definition and the criteria for correct definition , formal and informal fallacies, immediate and mediate inferences, the different types of syllogisms, etc

 

 

COMP 105.  Introduction to Computer Technology, Cr.hr. 3

Pre-requisite – None 

Course Description

This course introduces fundamentals of hardware and software of computer systems and including how data are represented in the computer.  The theoretical and practical sessions are given in parallel.


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